Review: Yamaha CFX Concert Grand Piano

Yamaha CFX Piano

It’s not every day that a brand new concert grand is introduced to the market, and without doubt it’s rarer still for an instrument of the quality of the Yamaha CFX to make such an impressive and powerful entrance to the musical world.

Yamaha is certainly not new to building fine concert instruments. Since the 1960s Yamaha Concert Grands have been regularly featured in venues, and the CFIIIS has been a stalwart of stages throughout the world since its introduction in 1991.

It is the nature of Japanese enterprises continually to develop and improve. Yamaha is certainly no exception to this, and it has always been the goal of the Yamaha piano company to produce nothing less than the finest concert grand in the world. Indeed, this was the aim of developing and building the CFX.

CFX Concert Grand PianoThe development of the CFX took many years and was undertaken with extraordinary attention to detail. Yamaha technicians studied the characteristics of the world’s finest handmade pianos, determining what it was that gave each of them their particular quality. They talked to hundreds of  the world’s most accomplished pianists, including those that did not play Yamaha pianos, and they asked them all what it was they most wanted to see in a concert instrument, and also what they hoped not to see. They took all this research and distilled it into the design and production of an entirely new instrument.

A new factory was built, designed solely for the production of handmade instruments. Little by little, over the past three years, the CFX has started to make its appearance on concert stages and recordings. Everywhere it has gone it has received the highest accolades.

We have presented this instrument at several venues in our market, most recently when the piano was featured at a concert presented at the Schlesinger Center in Alexandra when Yuliya Gorenman performed Brahms’ First Piano Concerto with the Alexandria Symphony Orchestra (picture attached). The reaction of both performer and audience was extremely positive.

This is not surprising: the CFX is unlike any other piano. The action is exquisitely balanced, and it is incredibly easy to play. The dynamic range is astounding and it is possible to navigate from thundering bass notes to the most delicate highs with ease. The power of the instrument is impressive, and the depth of the sound, even at low dynamics, is amazing.

If you get a chance to hear or play the CFX, I urge you to take it. You will not be disappointed!

Yamaha Young Musicians Course

This fall semester is my first time to teach the new Young Musicians Course of the Yamaha Music School since it has been redesigned and available a year ago.  The Young Musicians Course (YMC) is a three-year program for beginners ages 6 to 8.  Through different class activities, students learn the basic musical skills, independence, creativity, and self-expression

The semester started in the second week of September.  It is rewarding to see the repaid growth of students in music in just 8 weeks of classes.  Both students and parents have been enjoying the Yamaha materials and approaches.  The regular class activities includes solfege singing, ear training, piano repertoire, and music theory.  Also in the curriculum, students would be exposed to music arranging, ensemble playing, and improvisation.

The Yamaha Young Musicians Course nurtures children’s love in music and develop their musicianship through a well-designed curriculum.  This eighteen-week program meets fifty minutes.  The spring 2013 registration is available online in November at www.keyboardcenter.com and the class starts in February of 2013.