Jordan Kitt’s Music presents a virtual student recital!

Jordan Kitt’s Music is pleased to present a virtual student recital featuring students from our Virginia Beach Showroom & Music Education Center, led by Studio Manager Mun Lee Han!

We’re extremely proud of the perseverance of these students and teachers in the spirit of “The Show Must Go On”, using a virtual platform so that all can enjoy the hard earned fruits of their practice!

Find out more about Jordan Kitt’s lesson programs here!

Jordan Kitt’s Music featured on WTTG Fox 5 on the importance of music in the home…

Jordan Kitt’s Music CEO Chris Syllaba was interviewed by reporter Holly Morris of WTTG Fox 5 in Washington, DC on the importance of music now that people are spending more time at home than ever before.

Jordan Kitt’s Music, representing Yamaha throughout Maryland, Virginia and Washington, DC., is currently open for business in all four of its locations, and lessons are continuing through online interactions.

For more information on lessons, rentals or new & used piano sales, visit https://www.jordankitts.com

Join us for a Facebook Live Concert featuring Yamaha Artist & Product Developer Craig Knudsen

Join us for a very special event featuring Yamaha Artist and Product Developer Craig Knudsen as he performs on the new flagship Clavinova CVP 800 series digital piano on Thursday, June 4th at 7pm EDT.

You can join it on Facebook Live here, or see it below!

Tony DeSare and the “Jordan Kitt’s Music Piano Song”

Here’s an interesting and entertaining video from international recording and performance artist (and our good friend) Tony DeSare coming to us from his studio with a recollection of writing the “Jordan Kitt’s Piano Song”.

It’s a piece he wrote to help us commemorate our 100th anniversary, and one you may have heard on the radio on stations like WTOP.

And here’s another performance of the song from the grand opening of our Rockville Showroom & Music Education Center:

See and hear more of Tony at his website here, and keep up to date on his area concert appearances!

Clarissa Bevilacqua wins International Mozart Competition

Our good friend Clarissa Bevilacqua has won the first prize at the 14th International Mozart Competition of the Mozarteum University Salzburg.  Clarissa performed at Merriweather Post Pavilion in the fall at a special event sponsored by Jordan Kitt’s Music and Howard County Plays as part of a series designed to bring music education and outreach to the general public.

Here are the details from thestrad.com:

The 18-year-old, from Italy, received not only the €10,000 first prize but also the €1,000 audience award and the special award for the best interpretation of a piece by Mozart – a copy of Bärenreiter’s New Mozart Edition. Bevilacqua, who has studied with Maria Luisa Ugoni, Daniele Gay, Olga Kaler and David Taylor, performed the composer’s Violin Concerto no.5 KV219 in the final round. Two years ago, aged 16, she became the youngest student ever to receive a Bachelor of Music in Italy.

Second prize and €7,000 went to Yun Tang, 27, from China. She has previously won prizes at the Shanghai Isaac Stern Competition, the International Yankelevich Violin Competition and the Schoenfeld International String Competition. Third prize went to 18-year-old Lorenz Karls, who was born in Vienna to Austrian-Swedish parents.

This year’s jury was chaired by Benjamin Schmid (Austria) and comprised Pierre Amoyal (France), Lars Anders Tomter (Norway), Jan Vogler (Germany), Andre Mijlin (Spain), Hanna Weinmeister (Austria) and Gerhard Schulz (Austria). A total of 182 applicants from 37 nations registered for the 2020 competition, with 28 violin candidates admitted. Each of the three finalists performed with the Salzburg Orchestra Soloists under the direction of Tibor Bogányi.

Get a preview of the Fall with the Jordan Kitt’s Music School Newsletter!

Another season of fabulous music making has come and gone, and there is so much to look forward to as fall begins!

The students at Jordan Kitt’s Music have given dozens of recitals, performed for events, festivals, and competitions throughout the region, and have grown as musicians in private lessons and in the Yamaha group classes at each of our three locations in Rockville, Fairfax, and Beltsville. The Jordan Kitt’s Music Piano Festival continued this year with more than 60 performers, and a fantastic Honors Recital that showcased the hard work of 18 talented young artists and their teachers. We are thrilled to provide our students with the best educational and performance opportunities we can and look forward to another year of music making with you!

Get your instant copy of the newsletter in pdf format here!

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Enroll in lessons today here!

How Music Saved My Son’s Life

from ADDitude mag

My son’s young life was a matrix of appointments — ADHD specialist, child psychologist, occupational therapist, audiologist, speech therapist. He struggled in school and was in trouble more often than not. Then one day he discovered a beat-up, old piano and his entire life followed a new and wonderful trajectory.

Can attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or ADD) respond positively to the healing power of music? My youngest son, Michael, is living proof that music can change lives — and brains.

Michael was 10 days old before I saw him for the first time — his tiny, blue body lying limply in the incubator as he struggled to breathe. He was diagnosed with Hyaline Membrane Disease, a respiratory disease that makes gas exchange difficult or impossible. He was so ill that every time the neonatal staff touched him, his heart stopped beating. He had three cardiac arrests during the first ten days of his life. Doctors warned me that he might be brain damaged as a result.

But Michael grew and grew. A beautiful child with big blue eyes and blond curly hair, he was very hyperactive, demanding constant stimulation. He did not sleep through the night until the age of 2 and had me up five to six times a night to comfort and reassure him. “Let him cry,” people said, “he’s just being naughty.” But if we left him to “cry it out,” he would scream and cry until he went blue in the face and stopped breathing.

Michael was also extremely lovable, always laughing and smiling. But he did not measure up to his brother in terms of crawling, walking, feeding, and dressing himself. I was concerned about a developmental disorder, but my doctor assured me that all was well.

The bombshell hit when Michael went for his ‘School Readiness Tests’ at the age of 6. The psychologist noticed that he could not hold a pencil correctly. He would clutch it in his fist, instead of holding it between his fingers to write. Though Michael was highly intelligent with a good memory, he was diagnosed with ‘minimal brain dysfunction‘ (now ADHD) and we were shattered, but also relieved.

He wasn’t just ‘naughty.’ There was a reason why he did not seem to listen when spoken to; would daydream and become easily confused; would struggle to follow instructions; be easily distracted, miss details; forget things and constantly demanded attention. He talked non-stop, would twitch, fidget and squirm constantly in his seat. If he flew into a rage, he could not control himself; on occasion, we had to stop him from beating his older brother to a pulp.

We saw an ADHD specialist, who referred as to several medical professionals whom, unfortunately, the Medical Aid did not cover. We were really struggling financially at the time, but somehow, we found the money. Michael saw a child psychologist, occupational therapist, audiologist, speech therapist, etc. Still, the doctor told us that, because Michael was ADHD, he would probably drop out of school early. The best thing we could do was to let him start school early, so that when he failed and repeated a year, he would still be the same age as everyone in his class.

We followed his advice, which I have regretted all my life. Had we just let Michael start school a year later, his journey would have been far less difficult. He would have been more mature emotionally and better able to cope intellectually. We enrolled him in a private school, thinking he would cope better in a smaller class. In the beginning, Michael lived up to the psychologist’s expectations. He had difficulty concentrating at school; he did not understand the work and drove the teachers crazy with his hyperactivity. It was so bad that the teachers would duct-tape his mouth and tie him to his chair with his hands behind him. At the time, we had no idea that they were doing this to him.

At the age of 9, Michael discovered a toy piano that a friend of mine had left lying around. He found that he was able to listen to tunes on the radio and work out to play them on this piano. Though his father and I were divorced by then, we immediately recognized his talent, clubbed together, bought him an ancient piano, and organized for him to have music lessons.

He excelled in piano lessons, which in turn had a positive impact on his schoolwork. He found that he was able to concentrate better in class and the work at school started to make more sense. What was most important, though, was that he started to believe in himself. Until he started playing the piano, he was convinced that he was stupid and not capable of doing the things that other children could. Playing the piano was something he was good at, and not many other people were able to do. When he started to get 100% on his music theory exams year after a year, he began to believe that perhaps he was not as stupid as everyone made him out to be.

Read the full article here

Great video on the NAMM Fly In Event to Washington DC…

Here is a great recap from the folks at NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) on this year’s fly-in event to Washington DC.

The furtherance of music education in schools and throughout the communities we serve is one of the reasons Jordan Kitt’s Music has been in the piano business for more than a century.

For more details, visit the original article here.